tau Herculid Meteor Shower

~~ a short essay ~~

by tkbrown

There may be a fantabulous meteor shower tonight, or it may prove to be nothing at all. NASA seems rather impressed with the possibility of a spectacular showing from the debris associated with the disintegration of Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (SW 3). “Bill Cooke, a NASA astronomer who tracks meteor showers at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama said it all depends on the speed of the material from the comet,” (Malik, 30 May 2022). He said, “‘If the debris from SW 3 was traveling more than 220 miles [354 kilometers] per hour when it separated from the comet, we might see a nice meteor shower,'” (Malik, 30 May 2022). However, Cooke later added, “‘If the debris had slower ejection speeds, then nothing will make it to Earth, and there will be no meteors from this comet.;’ it was Cooke who said the tau Herculid meteor shower would be ‘all or nothing‘,'” (Malik, 30 May 2022).

Comet SW 3 was first discovered 2 May 1930 by two astronomers–for whom it is named–at the Hamburg Observatory in Bergedorf, Germany, (Rao, 22 May 2022). “While exposing plates, the two men discovered the faint image of a tiny new comet,” (Rao, 22 May 2022)–92 years ago SW 3 first revealed itself. “The comet completes an orbit of the Sun every 5.4 years,” (Rao, 22 May 2022). Over the course of several decades, several orbits were not observed, but in March 1979, sky watchers began recording viewings again. Twenty-seven years ago, SW 3 increased in brightness and could be seen with the naked eye, (Malik, 30 May 2022; Rao, 22 May 2022). Prior to 1995, viewing SW 3 was only possible with telescopes, but in October 1995, the comet was boasting a brightness four times what it had been in previous orbits of the Sun. At this time, the comet was observed to have split, with “at least four remnants” seen. When visibility was recorded in 2006, Joe Rao reports more than sixty-eight fragments were noted, (Rao, 22 May 2022).

During SW 3’s 2017 orbit of the Sun, continued fragmentation was seen. So, tonight’s 2022 orbit may reveal numerous shooting stars across our darkened sky on this night: May 30/31. If the speed of entry into Earth’s orbit is fast enough, the fragments should be visible. A slow ingress will diminish their brightness, and they may not be seen. If Earth’s May 2022 passage is through a full-fledged meteor storm, tau Herculid’s implosion may once again be discernable. (Rao, 22 May 2022).

So, if you have plans to watch for tau Herculid’s meteor show tonight, let us know–afterward– what it was like. I am looking forward to reading your responses. Thank You for reading!

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Here is what I have found so far regarding live viewings of the tau herculids meteor shower last night. From Facebook:

AIO Knowledge

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https://www.msn.com/en-us/video/peopleandplaces/2022-s-longest-meteor-shower-so-far-lights-up-brazil/vi-AAXZFYP?bk=1&ocid=msedgntp&cvid=86480501adf34bba8ced0c7851a56406&category=foryou

This video was posted on msn.com 1 June 2022: tau Herculids meteor shower as seen in Brazil.

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Photo Above: by Austin Schmid @Unsplash.com.

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Sources:

Malik, Tariq. (30 May 2022). How to watch the potential tau Herculids meteor storm live online tonight. “space.com.” (Retrieved 30 May 2022). https://www.space.com/meteor-storm-tau-herculids-shower-webcast?utm_source=notification.

Rao, Joe. (22 May 2022). A meteor shower outburst from a shattered comet may spawn new tau Herculids display on May 30. “space.com.” (Retrieved 30 May 2022). https://www.space.com/meteor-shower-outburst-tau-herculids-cohttps://www.space.com/meteor-shower-outburst-tau-herculids-comet-possible-2022met-possible-2022.

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Asteroid: 7335 (1989 JA)

~~ a short essay ~~

by tkbrown

The world has been watching to see if an Apollo-class asteroid, provisionally referenced as 7335 (1989 JA), would come closer to Earth than predicted by NASA. “Four times the size of the Empire State Building and travelling 20 times faster than a speeding bullet” (Specktor, 24 May 2022), some scientists have said the asteroid’s path was too close for comfort. “If the projected trajectory across our orbit had deviated, it could have hit Earth” (Specktor, 24 May 2022). However, Specktor cautioned, “the likelihood of that happening was pretty small considering the fact its path circumvented Earth by a mere 2.5 million miles.” He added, “the Earth will not encounter the orbit of 7335 (1989 JA) again until its next flyby on 23 Jun 2055.”

The rocky mass, “was first detected 1989 by astronomer Eleanor Helin at the U.S. Palomar Observatory in California,” (Eds. Wikipedia, 26 May 2022). The editors at Wikipedia quoted Mainzer, A; Gray, T.; et al. in saying, “a survey by NEOWISE (a mission of NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer)” the asteroid has an albedo of 0.31–0.32, which is more than twice the albedo of the Moon’s reflector score of around 0.14–and half again the typical albedo for stony asteroids.” (Mainzer, A.; Gray, T.; et al, August 2011). According to Wikipedia’s page, Albedo, “unusually high radar albedo is indicative of high metal content in asteroids (27 May 2022).

For those wishing to learn more about what transpired as 7335 (1989 JA) passed Earth, enter “7335 (1989 JA)” on Google’s search page. You will be given options to access “space.com,” “livescience.com,” and several other sources which will open a plethora of related facts. If you find something interesting that I did not mention, please share it in the “Comments” below. Also: Please, don’t forget to click the “Like” button before leaving my blog. Thank You for reading!

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Photo Above: by Paris Saliveros at Pixabay.com.

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Sources:

Eds. Wikipedia. (26 May 2022). (7335) 1989 JA. “Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.” Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Powered by MediaWiki. (Retrieved 27 May 2022). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/(7335)_1989_JA#cite_note-WISE-2.

Eds. Wikipedia (27 May 2022). Albedo. “Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.” Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Powered by Mediawiki. (Retrieved 27 May 2022). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albedo#Astronomical_albedo.

Mainzer, A.; Gray, T.; Bauer, J.’ Masiero, J.’ McMillan, R. S.; Cutri, R. M.’ et al. (December 2011). NEOWISE Observations of Near-Earth Objects: Preliminary Results. “The Astrophysical Journal.” 743 (2): 17. (Retrieved by Wikipedia 26 September 2016). NEOWISE Observations of Near-Earth Objects: Preliminary Results – NASA/ADS (harvard.edu) on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/(7335)_1989_JA#cite_note-WISE-2.

Specktor, Brandon. (24 May 2022). Asteroid four times the size of the Empire State Building barreling toward Earth on May 27. “Space.com.” (Retrieved 27 May 2022). https://www.space.com/asteroid-encounter-7335-1989-JA.

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The Law of Thy Mother

~~ a devotional ~~

by tkbrown

“My son, hear the instruction of thy father, and forsake not the law of thy mother.”

Proverbs 1:8 — “Holy Bible: Old Testament, King James Version (KJV)”

Unless there is a conscious decision to not have children, most women become a mother at some point in their lives. There is no instruction book that comes with the role, and since each child is different any manual would fall far short. While there are all sorts of resources available on the subject, there are answers to questions that still remain elusive. For me, Christ’s life provides all the answers needed to address any situation one might encounter in life.

As a Christian, I am to live my life in such a way that God is placed first, my family second, then others. As a mother, I am to teach my children these principles and the importance of love in all relationships. I am to provide the care and nurturing that teaches, by example, the love Christ has for every person and the importance of emulating His love when interacting with others.

I am to comfort my children when they are in pain and to teach them respect for others when it is necessary to address that pain with another person. Christ told us to turn the other cheek when someone does us wrong, to do good to those who spitefully use us, and to love our enemies as well as those who treat us right. In His teachings, we find that it is easy to love those who love us, but it is difficult to love those who are not good to us. In doing this, we demonstrate Christ’s love to others as we do the will of the Father in heaven.

My child is a part of me, and I am a part of my child. My unconditional love for him or her teaches there is always a safe place to go when hurting. This is what Christ and God provide for us, and we who are God’s children can go to them with any need or concern without fearing the pain of rejection. This is the role of a mother’s love; our love and comfort will always be there when our children are hurting. We rejoice with them in their successes, and we hurt with them when they hurt.

Just as God expects us to put our best effort into living the way His Son has instructed, it is important for a child’s mother to impress upon her children their duty to do their best in all they do. Our responsibility does not end with providing a safe haven. It also includes teaching the skills necessary to living throughout life. We are to help them learn to make choices and decisions in such a manner that, when they are grown, it is not necessary for them to come running home when a new crisis occurs. Mother should have already helped them learn these skills.

Yes, father is to instruct them too, but father typically does not have as much time to interact with the children as mother does. So, by default, much of this responsibility falls to mother. This is the reason Proverbs 1:8 teaches a child to “hear the instruction of his/her father and to never forsake the law of their mother.” Thus, mother is not just a comfort zone. There must be instruction and discipline from her as well. This is reflected in the parental admonishment found in Proverbs chapter 22:

“Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.”

Proverbs 22:6“Holy Bible: Old Testament, King James Version (KJV)”

When Paul commented about Timothy’s unfeigned faith, he referenced the faith of Timothy’s grandmother Lois and of his mother Eunice. This suggests a mother’s faith has much influence on the level of faith found in the children.

“When I call to remembrance the unfeigned faith that is in thee, which dwelt first in thy grandmother Lois, and thy mother Eunice; and I am persuaded that in thee also.”

2 Timothy 1:5 “Holy Bible: New Testament, King James Version (KJV)”

So, perhaps faith in God is the most important characteristic I can instill in my child while they are young in order to be assured of them searching out God’s will for them in any situation. As they grow to adulthood, children may stray from Christ’s teachings when tempted by Satan’s wiles, but a strong faith in childhood will most often bring them back again to the love, comfort, and protection of God the Father.

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Photo Above: @photosbybeks on Unsplash.com.

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Sources:

Eds. King James Bible Online. (November 2007). Proverbs 1:8. “Holy Bible: Old Testament, King James Version (KJV).” U.S. Congress. (8 May 2022). https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/Proverbs-1-8/.

Eds. King James Bible Online. (November 2007). Proverbs 22:6. “Holy Bible: Old Testament, King James Version (KJV).” U.S. Congress. (8 May 2022). https://www.kingjamesbible.me/Proverbs-22-6/.

Eds. King James Bible Online. (November 2007). 2 Timothy 1:5. “Holy Bible: New Testament, King James Version (KJV).” U.S. Congress. (8 May 2022). https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/2-Timothy-1-5/.

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Unmanned Littoral Mine Detection

~~ a short essay ~~

by tkbrown

The new MQ-8C military helicopter is an unmanned system which conducts drone searches for nearshore mines. It will provide valuable weaponry during active wartime. This approach to littoral mine detection was first discussed on “Talker” by Dean Murray. It will allow the military to clear a route for the Marines, Navy Sea Bees and Navy Seals to enter a specified target area with less danger presented to them by underwater mines.

The littoral mine is a probability I had never really considered. Land mines have always been thought of when our military is engaged in active warfare because I had a brother who stepped on a land mine during wartime. I also recall other members of my family discussing the various types of land mines encountered during active duty. Discussion of underwater mines has never been a topic of conversation so far as I can recall.

Now that the MQ-8C helicopter has been put forth as such a valuable weapon during wartime, this probability should be considered by both military and non-military alike. This says the littoral crossings present as much danger for our militia as the coastal areas are once the soldiers have moved onto the specified land region. Future areas of potential deployment for the MQ-8C Fire Scout was discussed more thoroughly in the article “US to send unmanned helicopters into combat,” by Dean Murray via SWNS on “talker: Talker News” published by msn.com.

Coming from a family heavily represented in various branches of the United States military dating from the American Revolution to current times, this news is a valuable bit of information to me personally. It helps to ensure the increased safety of future familial deployments to active wartime duty. The abilities of drone technology continue to amaze me, and their use in active military engagement is one of the best uses for this device.

I am curious to see new innovations as they continue to be developed. We have some highly intelligent minds behind the creation of such weaponry. Those who are involved in this effort are to be commended. Salute!

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Photo Above: by Terrence Burke @Unsplash.com.

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Source:

Murray, Dean. (7 March 2022). US to send unmanned helicopters into combat. “talker: Talker News.” msn.com. (8 March 2022). https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/us-to-send-unmanned-helicopters-into-combat/ar-AAUK7rR?ocid=msedgntp.

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Children First . . . Call Reps

USA Citizens – Call United States Senators and House Representatives

by tkbrown

The United States Senate in Washington D.C. is currently debating President Biden’s Stimulus Relief Bill. Part of that relief bill is a Child Tax Credit allocating $3,000.00 per child dispersed at the rate of $250.00 per month on a temporary, one year basis. According to Joseph Zeballos-Roig at “Business Insider,” President Biden supports making this $3,000.00 payment to parents a permanent, annual disbursement instead of an one-year payment.

Feed our Children! House our Children!. If you support my previous statement that we should provide food and housing for Every American Child before we try to pay those expenses for children beyond our borders, call your United States Senators and Representatives. I realize we need to help children in other countries, but we must take care of our children before we try to tell other countries how to care for theirs. We have many children in America who go hungry and have no permanent place to call home–a problem even before COVID-19. Help provide these children their basic needs!

If you do not know the names of your Senators and Representatives to the United States Congress, it is time to change that. Help support this provision in the Pandemic Relief bill being debated in the United States Senate as I write. Call these Senators and Representatives! Tell them to support the inclusion of this provision on the permanent basis rather than a one-time allocation. Help feed and house our childrent! No child in America should be doing without!

If you are unable, or prefer an alternative action, email your Senators and Representatives in Washington D.C.! It is imperative we take action to provide these needs for our children!

If you agree–even those of you living in another country–Like, Comment, and Share this post with all of your followers! Thank You for supporting America’s Children!

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Source:

Zeballos-Roig, Joseph. (4 March 2021). Biden supports making a temporary $3,000 payment to parents permanent in stimulus bill. “Business Insider.” Microsoft News: msnlcom. (4 March 2021). Biden supports making a temporary $3,000 payment to parents permanent in stimulus bill (msn.com).

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Photo Above: by Jude Beck @Unsplash.com.

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Child Poverty

~~ an essay

by tkbrown

When I began actively blogging on tkbrownwriter.wordpress.com and Tweeting on Twitter–@tkbrownwriter–there were many who were constantly orating regarding the hunger, starvation , and homelessness plaguing children from other countries. These children were being swarmed to and across our southern border by parents who would never qualify for entry if they entered via the legal immigration requirements. I agreed somewhat with what they were saying, but I was also concerned about children in America who suffer similar needs which were not being met.

Finally, I responded to the orations with an appeal acknowledging the validity of the needs being promoted while also noting the responsibility we hold to meet the needs of our own chidren. I told them, every night here in America many children go to bed hungry because there is not enough food to eat. In winter, many of those same children go to bed cold because the family budget was not sufficient to pay the heating bill. Many don’t even have a place to call home. How can we be an example to the world if we neglect our own to care for others. We need to first address the hunger and housing needs of our own America born children before trying to meet the needs of children from other countries. Now, the coronavirus has compounded these problems exponentially.

“There is currently a push in Congress to address the needs of every American child living in one-parent households earning $75,000 or less per year or in a two-parent household earning $150,000 or less per year. This plan would provide families of children ages 0-6 an additional $300 per month per child. It would also provide families of children ages 6-17 an additional $250 per month per child. These monthly disbursements would be made via the IRS Department” (Stein, 2021). The children of America are in much need of this additional assistance. The wealthiest country in the world should never be plagued with a reputation of not caring for its own.

While I am not one who typically condones regular and continuous dependence upon government subsidy funds. I do believe we owe it to our children to ensure they are not going hungry, or cold, or living on the streets. If we cannot take care of our own children, why should we be considered the country of choice for these needs by parents of children in other countries.

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Source:

Higgins, Tucker. (4 February 2021). “Romney child-payment proposal would spend more than Biden plan – but also aims to cut welfare programs.” CNBC. cnbc.com. (8 February 2021). Romney unveils plan to send families up to $4,200 per year per child (cnbc.com).

Stein, Jeff. (7 February 2021). “Senior Democrats to unveil $3,000-per-child benefit as Biden stimulus gains steam.” The Washington Post. Microsoft News: msn.com. (7 February 2021). Senior Democrats to unveil $3,000-per-child benefit as Biden stimulus gains steam (msn.com).

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My Morning Do . . . Writing Interrupted

~~ by tkbrown

21 January 2021 — I want to apologize for being absent so long. My computer was hacked and contracted a Trojan virus in early December. I just now am back up and running. It has been an interesting experience. I won’t bore you with the details. But, I will say I am learning a lot to facilitate my writing in the future. Each day brings new lessons in Internet Technology (IT), Artificial Intelligence (AI), and a host of other concepts.

I was beginning to feel lost without my computer and the ability to write productively. I find I must type when I write. When I try to write my thoughts by hand, my brain goes much faster than I can write. So, I tend to lose a lot of my thoughts before I can put them to paper. When I sit down to type, more often than not, my thoughts seem to flow through my fingertips to the keys beneath them. Thus, another thing I have learned during this time of absentia is that my computer is a great writing companion.

I see that many of you have checked daily for my return, and I am very appreciative of your loyalty. You are each a true blessing to me, and I will do my best to make up for my absence. You have shown me, beyond any doubt, the true allegiance of your following. When I said I needed to take time for the writing of my books and not make quite so many posts, I did not intend to go a month or more between postings. Thank You for bearing with me.

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Photo Above: by Aaron Burden @Unsplash.com.

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History in the Making . . .

~~ by tkbrown ~~

20 January 2021 — Today, as the world looked on, we here in the United States of America were writing history books. The recent past has been filled with opinions, opines, differences, similarities, divisions, bridges, peacemakers, rioters, love, hate, sickness, health, and all that is in-between. Each new day brought its own headline: Covid-19, politics, the politics of the virus, mutations, commutations, charges, pardons, verdicts, blame, and forgiveness. Some have learned and gained from the lessons of the past year while others have lost–both literally and figuratively. In the end, it all came down to today. The world saw a whole new view in America: a woman — Kamala Harris — was sworn in as Vice-President.

The concept of seeing a woman positioned as a leader in the upper echelons is new to America. There have been inroads toward this moment for at least a century and a half. While other countries around the world reached this milestone long ago, America — the comparatively new kid on the block — took her time. Many women have attempted to attain the goal of President or Vice-President, but all have fallen short of the achievement–until today. Kamala Harris set her eyes upon this goal some time ago. Today, as an African American, South Asian American, female American — the daughter of immigrants who chose to make America their home — was sworn in as Vice-President of the United States of America. Vice-President Harris achieved her goal.

There are those who say America is made up of bigoted racists. I believe today proved them wrong. As my old mother used to say, “The proof is in the pudding.” Today, the pudding in America’s melting pot rang true, and no victory could be finer. Once again, America has stood to the task and proved her ideals are still “alive and kicking.” When put to the test, Americans are winners, if they choose to be.

As a child, I was taught to never act in a racist manner toward any other person regardless of that person’s color or country of origin. As a teenager, I wrote my first poem about race relations. When my children were young, I began advocating for the underprivileged including children, people with disabilities, and people of color. As my children grew to adulthood, I tried to instill a respect toward all people and I continued my advocacy in the professional realm.

As we turned the page to a new chapter in America’s history, today the world witnessed the true potential for all who choose to make America their home. May God Bless America and all who live within her borders, and may we show the world the true colors of love and acceptance.

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Picture Above: by Gerd Altman @pixabay.com.

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My Morning Do . . . Tears

Tears of Grief — Grief of Tears

~~ by tkbrown — ≥∑

28 November 2020 — The worldwide loss associated with the Covid-19 pandemic has, is, and will have far more impact on us as individuals, as families, as communities, as states, as countries, and as a world than we might ever imagine. There is nothing to reference in responding to these losses. Yes, there have been pandemics before, but the world population, the interaction of countries around the world and the commercial interdependence around the world are far greater than ever before, so the impact of this type of phenomena is unprecedented.

The manner in which some of the losses have occurred, the extent of loss one individual must bear, the burden on families trying to somehow fill the shoes of a person, or persons, no longer with them–these are just a few of the personal losses being experienced. Similar losses have occurred in the professional/work realm, and at the governmental realm–and we are far from done with the related losses.

I believe these losses may be part of the impetus behind the need to protest to such extent as we are seeing in society today. There is no visible, touchable culprit causing these losses in our lives. There is not a “person” we can blame and vent upon, because it is not a person who caused the losses. This invisible force is ravaging our world, and the only way we know to let others know how much we are hurting is to savagely molest something that physically represents some other area in which we feel an intangible loss.

I would encourage caution in this approach. The one thing our families, governments, world do not need right now is another area of major loss. We need to shore each other up and find healthy outlets for our grief. A house divided is a house that falls. The same applies to governments and countries. Learn to grieve in healthy ways rather than creating more pain and grief. I know the tendency may be to lash out at the first possible expression of tangible loss. Remember, this only creates layers of losses. Do what you can to relieve the situation rather than add to it.

True grief, the cleansing kind of grief, involves the shedding of tears. If we do not ever cry, we can never release all of the negative. This release allows us to truly hold the good close to our heart. Many times, I have cried for the loss of someone I love. Many other times, I have told myself to “suck it up and be and adult.” Big girls don’t cry is the message I was sending myself. The question is: “Why did I send myself that message?”

Society teaches both girls and boys not to cry. “Big girls don’t cry” and “Big boys don’t cry” are phrases children are taught as they grow. No one wants to deal with a whiney crier, so it is deeply ingrained into a person by adulthood. We all “need” to cry sometimes. When we experience a loss, it is oft important to acknowledge that loss with tears. If we do not do this, we are never truly cleansed of the negativity associated with the loss (i.e., self-talk: “I can’t go on without _____.” “I can’t do this alone.”). There are any number of negative things we may say to ourselves when loss occurs.

This, “big boys and girls don’t cry” is much more deeply instilled in boys than in girls. It is generally acceptable for a woman to cry–sometimes. After all, women are the weaker sex, so we cannot be expected to go through life without crying. Men, on the other hand, have to “suck it up.” The message sent to men says it is never ok for them to cry. To that, I say: “Hogwash!”

All of us need to cry sometimes to release the pain associated with loss. Men hurt, too, when a loss occurs. We need to make a special effort to teach boys and girls it is ok to cry when we are deeply hurt. We also should accept that there are times tears are shed from joy or gratitude–and that is ok too.

The grieving process in the loss of a dear loved one is never complete until tears are shed. If we want to let go of the negative aspects we associate with that person’s leaving us, we must release those associations with our tears.

When my Daddy and Mama died, I didn’t cry at all until the funeral (just before–on the way to it) for Daddy. When the tears started, they would not stop until I had emptied those feelings of loss and–yes, deprivation–I was feeling. I cried so hard it worried so me who were there. I knew I would never be able to see them, hug them, tell them I loved them–ever again. The pain associated with knowing this had to be released. Only then could I know I would always be able to talk to them, because they are both a part of who I am.

Just as God dwells inside me because I am His temple, there are bits of the people I have lost inside me too. It matters not whether they are family, friends, acquaintances, co-workers–whatever the interaction that made us care for them as a person–to some extent, we need to release those feelings of loss. The death of a loved one–other than Mama and Daddy–has never pulled so many tears from me before I could stop them. Yes, I love my siblings–and I cry when they die–but it is not as intense as losing Mama and Daddy. The important thing I must stress here is: the tears did not occur with that intensity again. Yes, I would tear up occasionally; sometimes, I would cry for a minute or two, but I never cried like that again. I released the intensity of the loss with those tears. This left me with the ability to remember the good parts of my life-giving interaction with them–to hold those parts of them close to my heart. It also left me able to meet the responsibilities of job, family, etc. in the days and months that followed.

This need to cry when loss occurs applies to men too. It is not likely they will cry as hard as I did, but they may. It depends on the extent of loss they are feeling. The loss of some loved ones is no less painful for them than for a woman. Society tends to instill the “no tears” approach much more deeply in men. Whether it is the loss of a person, a thing, or a place–either permanently or for a time, tears may need to be shed. The more dearly and more closely held to our heart, the greater the need for tears. This is true for men as well as for women.

I believe this message allowing tears to be shed at times can be conveyed through learning, in books, the media, social studies, and via other means. It can begin during early childhood and progress into adulthood. In this way, we can give each other–both male and female–permission to release the pain through tears. It is when this is not allowed, the grief of tears becomes a negative concept–so we learn to “suck it up, be an adult.”

The grief of unshed tears can be far more damaging to our psyche than tears of grief ever could be. Tears held in and never released may sometimes be seen as anger toward self or others, negative views of self and/or others, or in other ways too difficult to explain or discuss in a brief manner. It can cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and require the need for extensive processing to facilitate the healing of release. Whatever the setting, eventually those tears of grief must be shed or the grief of tears begins to become the norm.

If we think we cannot release our grief–that it must be held in until it is gone–we will never allow ourselves to properly grieve. It will not go away if we hold it in. So, if we can ever truly overcome our grief, the freedom and permission to cry will be a part of the path we take to the ultimate, healthy acceptance we desire to achieve. Healthy acceptance will never mean we do not miss the object of our loss. It means we accept the loss and its importance in our lives; we give ourselves permission to grieve for that loss when the need arises. This allows us to move past the grief and back into productivity.

I know, we don’t typically think of our familial and friendship relationships as an area of productivity, but a lack of productivity in these areas means those relationships die. Thus, a lack of interaction with family and friends–when it is within our ability–signals the probability of a loss that has not yet been resolved within. An unwillingness to interact signals that irreparable damage has been allowed to develop at some point in time. If not addressed and worked through (processed)–with or without the other person–healthy relationships are not likely to occur in the future because there will be a lack of trust. This lack of trust will impede the closeness of all relationships.

So, when loss occurs, give yourself permission to cleanse the unhealthy pain by allowing the tears to wash it away. Holding that pain in will cause its own grief–separate and apart from the loss. Big girls and boys do cry sometimes. These tears allow us to go on meeting other responsibilities so long as they do not dominate our life. Don’t allow your tears of grief to become the grief of tears not released.

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Sources:

Kubler-Ross, Elisabeth & D. Kessler. (2014). On Grief & Grieving: Finding the Meaning of Grief Through the Five Stages of Loss. Scribner. New York.

Kirby, Stephanie. Med. Rev. by Santa, Melinda. (17 September 2020). “The 7 Stages of Grief and How They Affect You.” betterhelp at betterhelp.com. Mountain View, California: betterhelp.com. (28 November 2020). https://www.betterhelp.com/advice/grief/the-7-stages-of-grief-and-how-they-affect-you/?utm_source=AdWords&utm_medium=Search_PPC_c&utm_term=_b&utm_content=80082676786&network=g&placement=&target=&matchtype=b&utm_campaign=6459244691&ad_type=text&adposition=&gclid=Cj0KCQjwqrb7BRDlARIsACwGad7NNf5XmV3-_em0YWLV2asKoQx8ZSJ4JJZ5K4bxBrDIFplE2zwlaWoaArSQEALw_wcBl.

Eds. Web MD. Reviewed By: Goldberg, Joseph, MD. (13 April 2018). Grief and Depression. WebMD at webmd.com. (28 November 2020). https://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/depression-grief#3.

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Photo Above: by pen_ash at pixabay.com.

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My Morning Do . . . Down on the Farm — I

~~ by tkbrown

19 November 2020 — From time to time, I begin to think anew upon the days when I was young, the things I did, the things I learned–things most folk today would have no idea how to do. I am thankful for those days, and I have fond memories of the learning, the doing, and the being a part of . . . whatever process was taking place.

I grew up on a farm in the middle of Brown Hollow in the heart of the Ozark Mountains–Southen Missouri, USA. We worked eighty acres–the back forty belonged to us, and the front forty belonged to my uncle. My uncle’s forty acres had an old clapboard house that served as our home. Life was not easy on the farm. We grew most of our food, herded cattle, sheep, a pig sty, rabbits, chickens, ducks, turkeys, guineas–you name it, we probably had it at some point in time–not really, but it often seemed to be the case.

Each summer, we grew a ten-acre garden and a small (probably an acre or so) kitchen garden right behind the house. Five acres of the main garden were dedicated to vegetables of various sorts. Each year, this section included some new vegetable. My Mama loved trying new vegetables–most often chosen from the Henry Fields Seed Catalog, the Burpee Seed Catalog, or from a brother or some neighbor’s son who were selling seeds as an FFA Project (Future Farmers of America). Through her venturesome nature I got my first exposure to Kohlrabi, Rutabagas, Peanuts, Beets, and learned of the many and varied types of tomatoes, green beans, etc. When it came time to plant or hoe, those rows seemed to never end. The remaining five acres were planted in corn and potatoes. The corn was mainly used to feed the stock during the colder months, but part of it was put into the freezer or canned to be eaten with family meals.

The potatoes were one of our staples. Our evening meals almost always consisted of cornbread and potatoes along with other filling, stick-to-the-ribs type foods–i.e., beans of some sort. The potatoes were typically boiled–with or without the jackets (peels)–mashed, fried, or creamed. We never had fancy food, but what we had was prepared and served with love. Since I was the seventh of nine living children, we all pitched-in and helped cook and clean up afterward. Teaching us how to cook took much of Mama’s time, but she made it seem like we were learning on our own–I still have not figured out how she did that.

My earliest memories of cooking began around the age of four. We had an old round oak, pedestal table where Mama did most of her biscuit making, and other baking preparations. When family would come from out of state or out of county, they always asked for her hand-slung biscuits. Each was about three inches in diameter and about three inches high. In a 9 x 13 baking pan, she would cook twelve biscuits–four rows of three. Mama was famous for her biscuits.

We had an old empty lard can big enough to hold about forty to fifty pounds of flour. With nine people to feed, that did not last long. Many breakfasts boasted Mama’s biscuits with eggs or gravy–or both. During the winter, we usually ate oatmeal with those biscuits.

When seh was prepping food to cook, I would sit on the lard can–which also served as my seat at the dinner table–and watch her prepare those biscuits. She would let me dip the flour out of the can for her to sift, and as I learned the process, I was allowed to sift too. When she made short-bread or cornbread, I could help stir. I have no doubt this was the beginning of me loving to cook. As I was learning to cook, I took the experience outside and blended it into playtime by making mudpies and all sorts of goodies to be served to a make-believe family at a make-believe table. As I grew older, instead of mudpies, I made cakes, pies, cookies, coffee cakes, etc. which were eaten at my real-family mealtime. I became known in the community for my cakes. There were those who would make a special trip to get a piece of cake if they knew I was baking. This was quite a feat in a rural community with very few telephones. This says even people from the community encouraged skills which were above average. Cooking has been a hobby of mine since that time.

I remember when I was four years old, we were preparing for an especially difficult winter when the money was tight. Daddy went to the old smokehouse and brought-out an old, old, hand-grinder for corn and other grains. We used it to grind corn for cornmeal. The grind was very coarse, more like grits than cornmeal, but it worked. It was an interesting learning experience for a four or five year old.

The old smokehouse was built using 1/2 inch x four- or five-inch boards about seven feet long. These were nailed side by side onto the frame. The roof was aluminum colored tin sheets nailed to the trusses which were cross braced with 2 x 4s cut to fit. The wood was very porous from age and weathered to a gun-metal gray. When Daddy was a child (during the early twentieth century), the old smokehouse was truly used as intended–to smoke meats. It was one room with a flue in the roof which allowed the smoke to escape. I seem to remember, when I was very young, the door was attached with straps of leather. At some time during my early years, those straps were replaced with long, angled, black-looking steel hinges attached to the outside. During my childhood, the old smokehouse served as a storage shed for tools and other items that were beloved but no longer used. This is also where we kept the gardening tools–i.e., hoes, rakes, spades, picks, shovels, etc. Gardening was hard work, but the fresh produce was wonderful. I loved it.

The eggs we had for breakfast were most often laid by hens on the farm. They were grain fed, free range. We found laying nests in some of the strangest places, and the eggs were delicious. Sometimes, they were quite large. Once in a while, we would get one that had two yolks, These were typically a bit larger than the regular fare. When there was an excess of eggs, Mama would break enough for a meal of scrambled eggs into a plastic freezer container and freeze them. In wintertime, when the hens were not laying many eggs due to the cold, we would use those eggs–usually on the weekend.

Mama and Daddy would purchase two or three flats of baby chickens each year. We would tend to them as they grew. When they were about six weeks old, they were good to eat as fryers. We would kill, pluck, clean, cut and freeze enough to last most of the summer. During the fall, we would repeat the process with older hens and roosters which were used for chicken soups, chicken and dumplings, and fried chicken during the colder months.

We had a small herd of beef cattle and a small herd of milking cows. Daddy and my brothers would milk the cows each morning and night. We took out what we needed for the family, and the rest was stored in ten gallon cans which were kept in a cooling tank. The milkman would come twice a week, pick up what we had in the cooler and leave the empty cans for more milk. The cream on this milk ranged from an inch and a half thick on top of the milk to three inches thick. We skimmed most of the cream off to make hand churned butter. We often kept a gallon or two in the freezer. When Mama made grape dumplings in the winter months (using the half-gallon jars of grape pulp she had canned the previous summer), this frozen cream was scooped out and served atop the dumplings. Mmmmmm!!! This was some good eatin’ on a cold winter night.

There is so much more I could tell, but this gives a general synopsis of life “Down on the Farm” when I was young.

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Photo Above: by Gabriel Jiminez @ Unsplash.com.

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