My Morning Do . . . On a Barren Shore

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Just a Note: by tkbrown

Since we are also looking at the grieving process midst all the suffering from so many different sources, I decided to share with you today this poem. I penned it 4 November 2018, but it covers many concerns in our societal grieving process. It seems, we see a few days of reprieve, and then it starts all over again. As I mentioned a few mornings ago, society addresses the same concerns as individuals, it is just multiplied many times over because individuals, families, communities, regions, economies, countries, and the world are all grieving at the same time. So, I deemed it appropriate to share it this morning because so much grief can make everything and everyplace seem like a Barren Shore.

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. . . On a Barren Shore

~~ by tkbrown
I see your suffering,
understand that your pain is deep
as the ocean and wide as the universe,
that it holds your soul captive
midst the struggles of life.
It stifles your heart song,
makes even small inclines steep;
the best of days stretch forth -- an unending curse
cast with punishing missive,
stuffed with ripples of strife.
Making weakness seem strong,
the waves that powerfully creep
in from some deep untimely soulful immerse
as nauseous retchings that grieve
wounds like a sharp-edged knife.

If my understanding
can lessen the depth of your pain,
gladly will I cover the highest sharpest peak --
my body a shield to ward
off such murk from the moor.
Such inept grappling
I offer as shelter from rain,
saturating clefts of hiding, when dark hours sneak
to sharpen and hone the shard
hacking your inner core.
Still, it's an offering
of my heart, to lessen the stain
wrought by the effort to be strong when weak
due to loss that leaves one marred,
scarred -- on a barren shore.

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Photo Above: by pen_ash at pixabay.com.

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My Morning Do . . . Milk of the Word

~~ by tkbrown

1 Corinthians 3:1, 2 (NKJV)

  • 1 — “And I , brethren, could not speak to you as to spiritual people but as to carnal , as to babes in Christ.”
  • 2 — “I fed you with milk and not with solid food; for until now you were not able to receive it, and even now you are still not able;”

23 September 2020 — While working on posts for the “Greek Words for ‘love’ in the New Testament” series, I have thought much on my Biblical studies through the years. During my younger years, I studied mostly by verse and by topic. When I needed spiritual strengthening, I would search out scriptures on a particular topic and study it. The scripture was indeed food for my soul.

I grew up in a rural area, so our church family was small. When I was fourteen, I began teaching the Sunday night Children’s Class. There were five children in the class, ages five to twelve. We could not afford the purchase cost of lesson materials, so I started with the four Gospels, and we would take a few verses each week. I would write out the lesson sheets for each child.

The lessons consisted of scripture, copied word for word, with blanks to be filled in. During class, we would read the lesson scripture and fill in the blanks. The youngest could not write, but his siblings helped him fill in the blanks on his sheets. I knew from when I was younger, he could remember what we talked about, especially with two siblings who probably talked with mom and dad about what had been studied. During the two years I taught the class, we digested many morsels as they began being introduced to solid spiritual food.

As I have pondered the purpose for my reminiscing, I realized, the study of Greek words for “love” began in my teen years. The minister taught the teen / adult class. We did much the same as I did with the children, except we did not have fill-in-the-blank sheets. We studied directly from the scripture–a few verses a night. It was during my teen years, in these classes where I learned to study more in depth. The minister spoke of the Greek words for “love” occasionally during these classes, as he did for other words when he thought we could benefit from the learning.

I awoke this morning with understanding of why I had been pondering my younger days. I was being shown, during my teen years, how to study as a mature Christian. In order to do this, we begin as babes in Christ needing the “sincere milk of the word,” referenced by Peter in 1 Peter 2:2:

  • “as newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby.” (King James Version — KJV).
  • “as newborn babes, desire the pure milk of the word, that you may grow thereby.” (New King James Version — NKJV).

The King James Version (KJV) of the New Testament uses the wording, “sincere milk . . .,” whereas, the New King James Version (NKJV) has changed “sincere” to “pure.” Personally, I prefer the “sincere milk . . .” for this thought process. Just as I fed my babies “milk” in their early days in order to aid their healthy growth — especially bone and teeth growth needing much calcium, we as new Christians need the “milk” of the scriptures to form a firm foundation for our Spiritual growth. As we grow, we are introduced to the more mature instruction so we can develop strength in other areas as we also continue consuming the “milk” to aid continued strengthening of the foundation.

As I pondered this, I realized my attention was being brought to the “solid food” aspect of scriptural study. When I prepare an especially savory meal for physical nutrition, I savor every morsel. This savoring is part of the spiritual growth process too. It is necessary, at times, to take a scripture word by word to learn the true meaning behind the original Greek text in the New Testament. It is necessary to chew it slowly, try to discern which spices were added during preparation. What were the other solid foods added to the dish? Our spiritual study must be taken just as slowly at times.

I said all of the above to say this: The series on Greek words used for “love” in the New Testament is a word by word type of study. We are taking each word as a single morsel of solid food and savoring each flavor (meaning) in order to absorb the most nutrition (understanding) from the food. By learning the various words used in the original Greek text, we are sorting through the flavors of Greek nutrition in order to truly understand what the English version says when it only uses one word, “love,” in its translation.

It was necessary for me to step back and explain this before progressing any further with the Greek words for “love” study in order for you, the readers, to understand the importance of knowing the original Greek term. Just as a chef must know exactly which flavors are needed to achieve a certain flavor, it is necessary for us to know what words added to the flavor of the original text. This is what is meant by the apostle Paul’s reference to “solid food” in 1 Corinthians.

I hope this little aside helps you to understand the “why” behind the “what” of what we are doing with this study. This is my prayer! Blessings to all!

My Morning Do . . . English Usage of “love”

~~ by tkbrown

22 September 2020 — Yesterday, I summarized the six Ancient Greek words for “love”. In reviewing available information for those words, I found a number of variations for them which I want to research some more so I can cover them with usable and understandable information.

I was excited to learn some of you will be looking forward to these posts. Various reasons for the anticipation were given. I have also learned some other topics of interest from others with specific interests. I want to take this opportunity to say, “Thank You”, for letting me know the posts will be of help to you. I appreciate you taking the time to tell me this. Please feel free to let me know, any time, when you have a certain topic of interest and I will try to address it in more depth if that is your preference. Again, Thank You, for keeping me informed of your interests.

Today, we will look at the English definitions for “love”. In the English language, “love” represents all forms of the word. It also represents both the noun and the verb usage. There are myriad other words in the English Language to describe more adeptly the type of love one is referencing, but the word “love” suffices in most cases. All of this information is gleaned from https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/love#. The full citation is located at the bottom of this post.

After I have covered the English “love” and the Greek words to cover the various forms of “love”, I will look briefuly look at words of “love” utilized in other languages. With discussion of the Greek words, I will post Bible Verses as examples of each form found there to help you understand the usage. All forms are not utilized in the Bible; some essayists coverage of the topic vary in the number of forms said to be used in the Bible. I will search those differences and the reasons given for the differences. Hopefully, this will clarify the usages for you.

Along with, but a separate portion of the Greek word coverage, I will also give the Hebrew words for “love” and examples of usage in the Old Testament. The Old Testament was written in the Ancient Hebrew language. Hopefully, this information will help clear up some questions as well.

If you have questions not answered in my posts, put them in the comments with a ping-back to your site and I will answer them at the end of each section (i.e., English, Greek, Hebrew, etc.) — all at one time.

Without further ado, here are the Merriam-Webster definitions for both the noun and verb forms of the word, “love”. There are some interesting tidbits at the bottom which I also found on the Merriam-Webster post.

1 — love (noun)

  • strong affection for another arising out of kinship or personal ties
    • (e.g., maternal love for a child)
  • attraction based on sexual desire : affection and tenderness felt by lovers
    • (e.g., After all these years, they are still very much in love.)
  • affection based on admiration, benevolence, or common interests
    • (e.g., love for his old schoolmates)
  • an assurance of affection
    • (e.g., give her my love)
    • in love — inspired by affection

2 — love (noun)

  • warm attachment, enthusiasm, or devotion
    • (e.g., love of the sea)

3 — love (noun)

  • the object of attachment, devotion, or admiration
    • (e.g., baseball was his first love
  • a beloved person
    • DARLING — often used as a term of endearment

4 — love (noun)

  • unselfish, loyal, and benevolent concern for the good of another
    • the fatherly concern of God for humankind
    • brotherly concern for others
  • a person’s adoration of God

5 — love (noun)

  • a god (i.e., Cupid or Eros) or personification of love

6 — love (noun)

  • an amorous episode
    • love affair

7 — love (noun)

  • the sexual embrace
    • copulation

8 — love (noun)

  • a score of zero
    • holding one’s opponent scoreless in tennis
    • (e.g., at love)

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1 — love (transitive verb) — also: loved, loving

  • to hold dear
    • cherish
  • to feel a lover’s passion, devotion, or tenderness for
    • caress
    • to fondle amorously
    • to copulate with
  • to like or desire actively; take pleasure in
    • (e.g., loved to play the violin)
  • to thrive in
    • (e.g., the rose loves sunlight)

2 — love (intransitive verb)

  • to feel affection or experience desire

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More Definitions for “love”

Noun (From the English Language Learners Definition of “love”)

  • a feeling of strong or constant affection for a person
  • attraction that includes sexual desire
    • the strong affection felt by people who have a romantic relationship
  • a person you love in a romantic way

Verb (From the English Language Learners Definition of “love”)

  • to feel great affection for (someone
    • to feel ‘love’ for someone
  • to feel sexual or romantic ‘love’ for someone
  • to like or desire (something) very much
    • to take great pleasure in (something)

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First Known Use of “love”

Noun — before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at: 1.

Verb — before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive verb: 1.

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History and Etymology for “love”

Middle English, from Old English lufu

  • akin to Old High German: luba
  • Old English: leof dear
  • Latin: lubere, libere, to please

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Source:

Eds. Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary. (Last Update: 2020 copyright). “love.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary. Merriam-Webster. (Accessed 22 September 2020). https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/love.

My Morning Do . . . “Love”

~~ by tkbrown

21 September 2020 — Do you know the meaning of the word ‘love’?

I have decided to look at the meaning of the word ‘love’ this week. I already knew the Greek language embraces several different words in the expression of ‘love.’ I had thought I would first give the definition of ‘love’ from the Meriam-Webster dictionary and then cover the Greek definitions. However, when I opened Merriam-Webster to the word ‘love,’ I found more definitions for the word than are found in the Ancient Greek language. Ergo, since the New Testament of the Holy Bible was originally written in Aramaic Greek, I decided to cover those definitions first. Then, I will cover the English language definitions of ‘love’ later.

The Ancient Greeks identified six words which defined various definitional approaches of the word ‘love.’ Those words are:

  • Eros, or sexual passion . . .
  • Philia, or deep friendship . . .
  • Ludus, or playful love . . .
  • Agape, or love for everyone . . .
  • Pragma, or longstanding love . . .
  • Philautia, or love of self . . .
    • (Krznaric, 2013).

Throughout my lifetime, I have frequently listened as ministers of God’s Word and various speakers referenced the definitions of ‘love’ as applied by the Ancient Greek civilization. Those definitions have aided me many times over the years, not only in studying the New Testament, but also regarding life issues in general.

The reason I decided to look at the word ‘love’ is the same as the topic of today’s “My Morning Do . . . “Love”. More specifically, love as it describes God. I want to focus on four verses which just barely scrape the tip of the iceberg when describing ‘love’ as it relates to God. The first of these is Ephesians 5:1, which I present below.

Ephesians 5:1 — “Therefore, be imitators of God as dear children, (NKJV).

Ephesians was written to the Christians at Ephesus by the apostle Paul around 62 A.D. while imprisoned at Rome, (Wikipedia, Eds., 2020). The verse says we are to be imitators of God ‘as dear children.’ How often do we see young children imitating ‘Daddy’? As children of God, we are to do the same. Thus, it is necessary to know God pretty well. Searching the scriptures on ‘God’, we find multitudes of descriptors. So, I decided to narrow it down and start with three verses in 1 John 4:7-9:

  • 7 — “Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God, and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God.”
  • 8 — “He who does not love does not know God, for God is love.”
  • 9 — “In this the love of God was manifested toward us, that God has sent His only begotten Son into the world, that we might live through Him.”

The authorship of First, Second, and Third John is disputed among Bible Scholars. Therefore, I will not discuss this today. We can look at that later. Suffice it to say, the author saw a need to pen letters admonishing Christians regarding their love for each other. In this light, the verses presented above testify to the love of God. He states, “God is love.” Thus, to be the kind of Christian God wants us to be, it is necessary to understand the various definitions of ‘love’ and how they applied–or did not apply–to Christians to whom the letters were written.

When combined with all the other topics I am addressing in “My Morning Do . . . ” it will take a few weeks to cover all aspects to which I wish to relate my discussion, because I do not want to take away from my other topics. So, I look forward to meeting with you (in blogosphere) regularly to discuss these various topics related to ‘love’ in “My Morning Do. . . . ” With that, I bid you Adieu until the morrow!

Blessings to all!

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Sources:

Scripture References are from the Holy Bible — New King James Version (NKJV).

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Photo Above: from pexels.com.

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My Morning Do . . . “Blessings”

~~ by tkbrown

20 September 2020 — This morning, I decided to do a search for scriptures related to blessings we are to give others. This is the flip side of receiving blessings from God through Jesus Christ. The scriptures abound regarding blessings from God–a topic of which I needed no convincing. God Blesses me daily in some way–at least once a day! I am ever thankful to Him for that! The convincing I needed was regarding my certainty I had seen scriptures depicting ‘our blessings granted to other people.’

Thus, my reasoning for searching out scriptures related to blessings from us to others is based on the topic of us receiving Blessings from God. When Jesus came to earth, through His life, He left an example of how we are to live. Since He regularly proffered blessings upon others, it seemed to me we must proffer blessings upon others. After all, to be a “Christian” means to be “like Christ,” “Christ like,” etc. Christ was always in prayer to God, thus I try to “pray without ceasing” as the apostle Paul taught us. So, I began my search . . . .

I found three New Testament scriptures related to us offering blessings to others. What intrigues me, is: We are to bless “those who curse us, those who render us evil, and those who revile us.” This is so very intriguing to me. I would have thought we should bless those needing encouragement. Then, when I thought on it, these would be precisely the ones needing encouragement in order to learn to live like Christ lived. This says, I am to bless those who practice witchcraft. I am to bless those who practice all manner of evil–which is Satanic, and I am to bless those who revile me. In other words, whatever the form of persecution directed toward me, I am to deflect it with a blessing in return. This would say, too, when someone does or does not agree with me, I should bless them. So, I believe my tendency to end my comments and responses with “Blessings!” is not a put-down or telling you I am being persecuted. I believe it is to be received in the Spirit intended–which is: “I care about you and any sufferings you may be going through, thus, I am blessing you in hopes of minimizing any suffering you may be receiving. When I do this, God Blesses me! Amazing! Simply Amazing!

Thank You, Jesus, for such a simple message in a world of such complexity!

Below, I leave you with the three New Testament Passages I found related to us giving blessings to others. If you know of any I missed, please comment and let me know their location. Also, please comment below and let me know what you thing of “Blessings” extended as a Sign-off Salutation.

Blessings to all!

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Romans 12:14 — “Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse.”

Luke 6:27, 28

  • 27 — “But I say to you who hear, ‘Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you,'”
  • 28 — “‘bless those who curse you and pray for those who spitefully use you.'”

1 Peter 3:8, 9

  • 8 — “Finally, all of you be of one mind, having compassion for one another; love as brothers, be tenderhearted, be courteous,”
  • 9 — “not returning evil for evil or reviling for reviling, but on the contrary blessing, knowing that you were called to this, that you may inherit a blessing.”

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Photo Above: by sachbearbeitung at pixabay.com.

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My Morning Do . . . “Losses”

~~ by tkbrown
19 September 2020
Midst all the grieving and lamenting
with such intensity the heart doth ache.
Whom can I trust? The pain, the not feeling
is more than this old, feeble soul can take.
One disaster hits, and then another.
Before I can stand up straight, I smother
the screams of anguish inside, and I hide
the pain because my neighbor cannot find
half of her belongings. How can I scream?
I need to be strong and help mend the seam
the storm ripped open before something else
renders it irreparable. Immense
are the threats to my survival, but I
am not important right now, and I sigh--
deeply, longingly--and look to the sky.

There is death and dying all around me.
Ash and charred wood, far as the eye can see
and I wonder, how will it ever be
the same; and I just want to run, to flee
and forget the loss stretching, engulfing
all. No home, no  business, no feeling
to express the emptiness entrenching
the dried riverbed; ash coating, drifiting
between the stones--gray, forlorn, seemingly
afraid to hope for better day. Achingly
eyeing the chard remains, desperately
recalling beauty--incongruently.
This is not a scene one would ever want
to revisit. Even new growth could not
erase the scars, the memories so scant.

As I contemplated the losses our country
and my fellow-citizens have experienced this week--
from fires and storms,
I grieved with them--for them;
and I penned these words
as an expression of my condolences.

To those not suffering loss at this time,
if you are ever in the path of such powerful forces,
evacuate!

Leave hearth and home!
No material belongings are worth your lives!
This cannot be stressed too much. 

The country, the world is already reeling
from unfathomable loss,
and the grieving process has begun.

The five stages of grief:
Denial,
Anger,
Bargaining,
Depression,
and Acceptance
have begun.

No two persons experience them in the same order
or to the same depth.
Oftentimes more than one can be seen at the same time.

Therefore,
no two countries will experience them the same.

Denial is not yet past--for us--
here in America!
The Anger has begun,
mostly in the form of rioting,
looting,
violence,
and mayhem
focusing on other areas
rather than the death and dying
all around us
directly related to coronavirus--

in our families
and in society.

So, the Denial has not passed.
It is still going on
along with the Anger,
and some Bargaining.

Expressions of Anger are being blamed
on events not truly related
to society's loss from the pandemic.

It is hard to separate personal loss
from societal loss.

Is that even possible?
I don't think so. 

Be strong enough to feel--more than the anger!
Be strong enough to heal--more, more than yourself!
It will take introspection refueled
to collectively grieve and to rebuild.

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Photo Above: by Dylan Nolte @Unsplash.com.

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Source: Kubler-Ross, M.D. and D Kessler. (August 2014). “On grief & grieving: Finding the meaning of grief through the five stages of loss.” Scribner. New York. (16 September 2020).

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My Morning Do . . . “Loss and Grieving”

~~ by tkbrown

18 September 2020 — The loss being felt by every person in America is unmistakable, but indescribable. The amount of economic security that existed, for the most part, prior to the onset of coronavirus was more than ever known. A mental review of our nation’s good times–and bad– show an economy never so fully engaged with the world. Now, the trust linking countries and economies has been severed in many cases. Some–stronger–are weathering the storm, but so much worse for the wear. This loss is not limited to that of individuals within the country. This loss is of the country. Our nation is hurting right along with every citizen, resident, and alien. We are not alone in this loss. Every nation in the world is reeling with us.

The sheer number of deaths in the six months since the pandemic struck American soil are unprecedented. For many, there has been no time to truly grieve for want of trying to survive. Those in the health professions have been too busy trying to save lives to properly grieve losses in their private lives. The illness is so insurmountable, neither individuals suffering from the virus nor those caring for them have been spared the trauma of long-term suffering. Post traumatic stress disorder is a given for many of the survivors and for their caregivers.

Here in America, a “lockdown” perse could not be implemented. Such is the cost of freedom. Most other countries do not enjoy “freedom” to the extent Americans do. Our constitution engenders the right to refuse such imprisonment, and our citizens did just that. The consequence of that refusal has been the insurmountable death toll we are seeing because that refusal brought with it a spread of the virus not seen in other countries where true lockdowns could be enforced. Our government has told its citizens, “you are free to choose; so, you have the responsibility to choose wisely or suffer the undesirable consequences that accompany poor decision making”. The whole country has this freedom, and much of the country did not choose wisely.

The losses associated with preventive efforts, such as self-quarantine, has been the closing of many thriving businesses. Even with efforts to minimize the impact, the individual lives scarred by sacrificing all will never be the same. Jobs, businesses, schooling, production, productivity as a whole has been limited to such a degree it may take years to overcome the setback.

No one saw it coming. No one had a plan because there was no guidebook. Nothing outlined before even came close to including all losses being experienced today. It is a “one step at a time” endeavor. We have made mistakes, but much has been done right too. For every choice, there is a consequence. When we do not know what the consequence will be for a particular action, we make regrettable mistakes. However, we do not have the time to moan and groan over those mistakes, and we do not have time to point fingers regarding mistakes. No one is immune; everyone has made mistakes.

The blame game wastes precious time. It is a form of denial regarding the true severity of the situation. Our citizenry must stop the infighting and admit the feelings associated with the losses without hurting self or others. The anger being expressed in the violence and rioting must stop. It is hurting innocent people, and it is hurting those inflicting the harm.

These societal losses are experiencing the same stages of grieving seen in individual loss, but on a much larger scale. The anger is a symptom of being ready to address the underlying feelings. So, it is time to begin communicating those underlying feelings. To do this, it is necessary to understand the stages associated with grief. Our society, as we knew it, has died–worldwide–and it is left to us to pick up the pieces, one at a time.

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Photo Above: by Dylan Nolte @Unsplash.com.

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Source: Kubler-Ross, M.D. and D Kessler. (August 2014). “On grief & grieving: Finding the meaning of grief through the five stages of loss.” Scribner. New York. (16 September 2020).

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My Morning Do . . . 17 September 2020

The Supernova

~~ by tkbrown
The path to somewhere comes out of nowhere,
curves out of sight up beyond yonder bend.
Perchance twill meet a worthy source out there
with whom to ponder just how we got here
and destination just out past Land's End.

Perhaps there will be a quaint launching pad
from whence to be flung past each orbital
rung, far outpacing mechanical cad
where stars procreate amongst ironclad
components of every known mineral.

Out where the white dwarf stars dance side by side
until one pulls too hard, with a great 'kaboom'--
a new supernova's elemental glide
casts heavy metals in universe-wide
spectacular view--chemical mushroom.

This luminous dispersal from the core
of a massive star in nuclear fusion
or gravitational combustion for
white dwarf collapse with outside forces more
than internal mass--remnant explosion.

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Photo Above: by Alex K 83 @pixabay.com.

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Just a Note: by tkbrown

The cosmos, with all its mystery, is an uncharted frontier yet to be explored. Will man ever truly know all that makes these uncharted spaces, or will it be like studies of the human brain in which we have found: “The more we know–the more we know we don’t know.”

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My Morning Do . . . “Grief”

~~ by tkbrown

16 September 2020 — The world’s anticipation of the year 2020 was something of a phenomenon. The 1920s were known as “The Roaring Twenties.” Perhaps we were wondering if the 2020s would be remembered in similar fashion. As the year began, we were looking at a world where economic recovery seemed to take hold, then it began to grow. Hopping a flight to the other side of the world was as commonplace as a trip to the next state was in the Twentieth Century. The concept of the end of the year being less was not one the world could grasp. There was no anticipation for the grief that lay ahead.

Today, six months into the coronavirus pandemic, the United States is groaning with grief. The country is coping with grief from losses no one could have dreamed of as the New Year took hold nine months ago. Now there is loss of loved ones, loss of work, loss of family gatherings, loss of in person worship services, loss of businesses, loss of seeing school friends, . . . the loss of life as we knew it. The United states is not alone in these losses. In many ways, the world is groaning too.

There is also anticipatory grief for the loss possibilities which lie ahead. The questions are just under the surface in most minds: “What next? Will I lose a loved one? Will I get sick and lose my life as I know it? Will I die too?” Everyone is thinking these things, but few will admit it. According to Elisabeth Kubler-Ross and David Kessler, the anticipation of future loss is a grieving process in itself.

Are you grieving a loss? Are you anticipating future loss? Both forms of loss create the need to grieve, but few will acknowledge the fact. “Hold your chin up!” “You will survive!” “Suck it up and go on!” “No one wants to hear you whine!” One or more of these statements–and others–are heard by most as the struggle to get through the death and dying around us goes on. People are exhibiting every stage of the grieving process, but few feel free to let it show. Grief is discussed so very little–even though it is happening all around. Most probably do not even recognize the symptoms.

I am not going to discuss the various stages of grief in this writing, but over the next weeks I will describe the stages and some of the societal symptoms of those stages. Even the violence seen in this country, and in others, is a symptom of societal grief. I believe it is time for us to look at the multiple sources of grief around us and begin to embrace the associated needs–in society and in our own lives. It is time to truly begin the grieving process for all of the losses we are trying so hard to pretend do not matter. They do matter! Our societal ills are saying if we do not allow ourselves to admit the reality of it all, human behavior will regress even more.

Yes, we must go on, but we must also stop and take some time to grieve the loss of a close family member and of other losses. The losses in areas of daily living as we once knew it need to be waded through. It is important to remember, “We must go on!” Somehow, we must pick up the pieces and patch them back together. We must, and we will, survive! This is ‘the scraps’ life gives us sometimes. So, feel it and move on.

Have a Blessed Day!

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Photo Above: by Dylan Nolte @Unsplash.com.

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Source: Kubler-Ross, M.D. and D Kessler. (August 2014). “On grief & grieving: Finding the meaning of grief through the five stages of loss.” Scribner. New York. (16 September 2020).

My Morning Do . . . “Logical Reasoning”

~~ by tkbrown

15 September 2020 — While social distancing, by design, necessitates families spending more time together, time spent playing board games and other games strengthen a number of skills needed throughout life. Card games, checkers, Monopoly, Dominoes, Scrabble, and myriad others available for purchase online and in stores require players to look, listen communicate, and act. Decision making plays a large role in winning and losing.

In order to win at a game and in life, rules must be followed. It is necessary to pay attention to what is being done by all players. Math skills are needed in Dominoes, cards, Monopoly, Yahtzee, and others. Thus, when daily chores are completed, sit down together and play games. Communication skills improve because individuals discuss more when sitting together than when each is off doing his or her own thing.

It is imperative to be able to go out and function solo, but success also requires the ability to interact with others in a productive manner. Family mealtimes is an ideal time to increase discussion about the day’s events and any lingering concerns. Even when not spending so much time together, it is important to try and have one meal each day together. Sometimes this may require getting up a bit earlier, making breakfast for everyone so this can occur with all family members sitting around a table or in the same room eating and talking with no distractions.

When the pandemic is over, it will be important to continue these activities with family. Thus, you will be able to influence patterns of behavior with regard to decision making, problem resolution, communication skills, working–and playing–together. Television time and individual computer time can be adjusted to make time for these activities thereby teaching time management. All activities taken together as a family improve abilities to function in activities away from family. So, do not just work together at home, play together too!

Have a Blessed Day!

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Photo Above: by Tai’s Captures @Unsplash.com.

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