Happy Reading — K-1

~~ a new blog post ~~

by tkbrown

Reading is the first foundation cornerstone of learning. If strong reading skills are not instilled early, as this foundation is being developed, later learning will prove to be far more difficult. It is important for a child to read during the summer and during the school year in addition to classroom requirements. This helps to increase his knowledge base regarding differences between his life and the lives of other children. It also provides ideas for activities she might want to engage in. The department of education in your state or country typically provides a list of books that are recommended for each grade level from Kindergarten through 12th Grade and beyond.

These books strengthen the child’s personal, academic, and social learning. They increase the likelihood of success in college and career endeavors. They encourage her to explore areas of study beyond specific interests and allow exploration to be completed without directly impacting classroom grades. Extra reading also increases scores on aptitude tests, and in a general sense the daily grades, due to increased exposure to words in the written story format.

Over the next few weeks, I am going to try a new blog post format each week about a book that is recommended for children in Level K-1. I will give preference to award winning books. There are many different types of awards given; to name a few: Caldecott Medal, Newberry Medal, Theodor Seus Geisel Award, and the Legacy Award. While other countries surely have their own special awards for children’s books, these are the most notable in the United States.

Next week, I will briefly review a children’s book whose name appears on the recommended reading list for children in Kindergarten and First Grade. As mentioned above, I will typically give special attention to the award winners. However, there may be other books on the grade level list that warrant special recognition too. Now that school years are coming to an end, the summer weeks will be an ideal time to begin a daily reading time with your child. Please allow him to read if he is able. If not able to read yet, involvement can be achieved by asking her to describe what is seen in the pictures as the book is being read–or as an “afterthought.”

If you like this idea, please scroll down and click the “Like” button. Then, please leave a comment about my new blog post idea in the Comment section further down.

So, “tune-in” again next week when we will review one book from the typical K-1 Reading Level on the Recommended Reading List. Happy Reading!

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