“The Book Hog” — A Book Review

~~ a short essay ~~

by tkbrown

The first book I have chosen to review–“The Book Hog,” by Greg Pizzoli–is a picture book from the “Books for Grade 1 — our recommendations” at k-12readinglist.com/. The ‘book hog’ goes to the library and checks out books but never returns them. When the librarian offers to help the ‘book hog,’ she discovers the reason he has not returned the books. As she continues working with the ‘book hog,’ he begins to return the books he has checked out, (Eds. k-12readinglist.com, 2022).

This is all I will tell you about this book, because I don’t want to spoil it for you–and fear I may have already–but you tell me. Please mom, either check the book out from your local library, or buy the book from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or any other bookstore you might like. Then, both you and your child should read the book aloud to each other. While reading, remember to stop from time to time and ask questions about the portion just read. This way, you will know your child has understood what you just read together.

Then, after the two of you have read it, come back (here) and tell me what you thought. I chose the “picture book” because, although it is on the first-grade list, kindergarten students will enjoy it as well–I think. I want to know what you think!

Moms, summertime is a fun time to develop the habit of reading with your kindergarten or first grade student if you have not already established this habit. When my children were older, I learned they enjoyed me reading to them even though they had been in school for several years. This surprised me. I had been led to believe students preferred to read for themselves once this skill had been achieved. This is not so. It is time spent with your children and should continue well into their school years. Once they learn to read, let them read to you–but you choose another book to read to them as well. Then, come back (here) and tell us about this time spent together–and tell us what you think of: “The Book Hog,” by Greg Pizzoli.

This book is a “Geisel Award” winner. My next post will explain the importance of the “Geisel Award” and why you should look for these books to read with and to your young children. Thank You for reading my book review! Remember, come back, and tell us what you think. Other students and their moms will be waiting to hear what “you” think before they secure it for their “Reading Time.”

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Photo Above: posted with the book recommendation on “k-12readinglist.com/.”

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Source:

Eds. k-12readinglist.com. (2022). K-12 School Reading List: Books for Grade 1 — our recommendations. k-12readinglist.com/. (25 May 2022). https://k-12readinglist.com/reading-lists-for-elementary-school-children/reading-list-1st-grade-children-age-6-7/.

Happy Reading — K-1

~~ a new blog post ~~

by tkbrown

Reading is the first foundation cornerstone of learning. If strong reading skills are not instilled early, as this foundation is being developed, later learning will prove to be far more difficult. It is important for a child to read during the summer and during the school year in addition to classroom requirements. This helps to increase his knowledge base regarding differences between his life and the lives of other children. It also provides ideas for activities she might want to engage in. The department of education in your state or country typically provides a list of books that are recommended for each grade level from Kindergarten through 12th Grade and beyond.

These books strengthen the child’s personal, academic, and social learning. They increase the likelihood of success in college and career endeavors. They encourage her to explore areas of study beyond specific interests and allow exploration to be completed without directly impacting classroom grades. Extra reading also increases scores on aptitude tests, and in a general sense the daily grades, due to increased exposure to words in the written story format.

Over the next few weeks, I am going to try a new blog post format each week about a book that is recommended for children in Level K-1. I will give preference to award winning books. There are many different types of awards given; to name a few: Caldecott Medal, Newberry Medal, Theodor Seus Geisel Award, and the Legacy Award. While other countries surely have their own special awards for children’s books, these are the most notable in the United States.

Next week, I will briefly review a children’s book whose name appears on the recommended reading list for children in Kindergarten and First Grade. As mentioned above, I will typically give special attention to the award winners. However, there may be other books on the grade level list that warrant special recognition too. Now that school years are coming to an end, the summer weeks will be an ideal time to begin a daily reading time with your child. Please allow him to read if he is able. If not able to read yet, involvement can be achieved by asking her to describe what is seen in the pictures as the book is being read–or as an “afterthought.”

If you like this idea, please scroll down and click the “Like” button. Then, please leave a comment about my new blog post idea in the Comment section further down.

So, “tune-in” again next week when we will review one book from the typical K-1 Reading Level on the Recommended Reading List. Happy Reading!

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10,000 Views — Thank You

~~ a short essay ~~

by tkbrown

Once again, I utter a resounding, “Thank You,” and humbly ask your continued support. I cannot tell you how surprised I was when I accessed my message from WordPress this past week. There are no words to describe how strongly I appreciate the continued support I receive from followers and from others. To have surpassed 10,000 Views of my website — tkbrown.org — is an amazing feat which has only been made possible by those who have and those who continue to support my authorship.

This is an Award I had actually never contemplated receiving. It tells me my writing touches some people strongly, and I appreciate that. Since I write in a variety of forms, my followers and readers are a diverse group. My goal has never been to appeal to only one group of readers. I hope to ultimately touch most readers on some level.

Whether you like what I write or dislike it, you have impacted my number of viewers, and I invite you to continue returning and reading my posts. One day, those of you who have not liked what I write may decide you do like a particular post. My goal is to continue attracting diverse groupings of readers and touching the hearts and souls of people everywhere.

I am now approaching 250 posts. I am not quite there, but I am closing in on it. So, if to date you have not found a post you like, please come back and sit a spell while you read from my various writing styles. I can almost guarantee you will eventually find something you like. When you do, don’t forget to scroll down and click on the “Like” button and “Share via Facebook and/or Twitter.”

I have made 230 posts on my website — tkbrown.org. I invite you to see what you think of them and let me know in the comments at the bottom of each posting.

Again, Thank You for such amazing support and loyalty to my site! I appreciate each of you!

Sincerely,
tkbrown

February 2021

~~ a calendar quindecim ~~

by tkbrown
Winter Wonderland
January moves into February,
and winter has settled in.
Sunny skies are often cloudy;
snow is on its way again.
Wind is blowing, howling--
a reminder to stay in and warm.
Hot soup will tame stomach's growling
and the goosebumps on my arm.
Awakening to a new day dawning,
out the window is now a wonderland,
a roaring fire in the stove is warming,
novelty in the air is quite grand.
Being snowed in can be so charming
if we fill the time with games, reading--
cooking memories for future sharing.

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Photo Above: by Long Luc @Unsplash.com.

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My Morning Do . . . Creative Minds

~~ by tkbrown

I have read a number of posts recently on the topics of hope and gratitude. During times like the world has been experiencing through the Covid19 pandemic, it is important to keep fueling both. It may take some effort to do, but the end result is worth far more than any wrangling we may encounter during our endeavor. Making a daily effort to review our sources of hope and the things we have to be grateful for helps too. Faith, too, helps give the strength and resolve needed during times of trial and adversity. My faith in God and Jesus Christ has pulled me through much in the past; so, I can and do always pull strength from the spiritual resources and values in my life.

It is difficult when jobs are lost, income is non-existent or mostly so. Oftentimes, we do not think to be grateful for our work, but it provides much hope in our lives. Subconsciously, we know, so long as we are able to work or have a job to go to, we can get through most anything. When the monetary needs are met in our lives, it reduces the stress level astronomically.

Sometimes school is our main activity. When this is the case, it is important to view it as our job. Our attendance and learning are fuel for our future work lives. School attendance helps one to be in the habit of getting up and getting out–typically on a daily basis. This prepares one for the daily attendance required in work schedules. Lack of attendance in either results in failure.

Even though the need for some required classes cannot be seen, each has a reason for its inclusion. The most prevalent example I saw during my college years was a lack of understanding for the need to take Algebra. Oftentimes, I heard classmates say it would never be used, but its value is in day to day activities. Most never relate the two, but: 2(a+b) = 2ab is nothing more than, (a = the cost of a can of corn, b= the price of a loaf of bread). When these are added together then multiplied by 2, perhaps we are looking at the cost of our weekly need for these items. Algebra is utilized in budgeting among other things. So, it is important to realize that even though school can be humdrum, it is necessary to future needs.

Hobbies are also a source of strength during times of trial. I love to knit and crochet. The idea of taking a straight piece of string and creating something beautiful and lasting has always been intriguing to me. Sewing has a similar effect. Taking a flat piece of cloth and creating a beautiful dress, blouse, shirt, pants, or suit–even something for the home–is a skill to be extolled. Creativity has no bounds in the needlework hobbies. This also rings true of playing a musical instrument, reading, researching, cooking, painting, photography, and the list goes on.

Having something one values in life makes times like these bearable because the voids can be filled with something vital and useful via our hobbies, work, school, faith, family, etc. If one does not stay busy doing something, the desire to live slowly drains from us. This is seen in severe depression. The hopefulness and helpfulness has been lost and must be found again if the desire to live is to be regained.

If you, or someone you love has lost hope due to the downside of the lockdowns and shelter at home orders, seek help from a professional who is trained to help you through this. Above all, do not lose gratitude for what you have. Most cannot honestly say they have nothing for which they can be grateful. If this is one’s view of things, it is time to make a conscious effort to regain gratitude for what is in our grasp. Make it a part of the daily routine to name things for which you can be grateful. Then, it is important to reach out and engage whatever is within your grasp to fuel a new hope for the future. Don’t give up, keep putting one foot in front of the other until you are through the swamp and can see the other side.

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Photo Above: by Sebastien Gabriel on Unsplash.com.

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